Well, she thought, it was an unusual day, and I'll just throw all the bad parts away."" That is Lee thinking -- she's...

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THE VERY NEAREST ROOM

Well, she thought, it was an unusual day, and I'll just throw all the bad parts away."" That is Lee thinking -- she's fifteen -- and she's had a good many days like that which have added a few years of adjustable commonsense to her young life -- ever since her mother had her first stroke bringing a third child, Peter, into the world. Lee has been taking care of all of them (their father is a doctor) -- whether it's teaching Peter (now eight, a scrawny, solitary kid) that ""all things have to die so the earth can be balanced"" or massaging her mother's lifeless hand. Miss Logan's really very good first novel overrides a situation you might choose to avoid and life is affirmed in the face of the erosion of illness and death. She has caught it all in gentle, ordinary terms which skirt the prosaic and never seems to tamper with the experience which seems to be happening in the nearest room of any house next door in a small town such as this; authentic, surely, and unaffectedly affecting.

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 1973

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Scribners

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 1973