A strange story, rooted in an old folk tale, skillfully written, tempered with fine Danish atmosphere, dialogue and nice...

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THE TRIAL OF SOREN QUIST

A strange story, rooted in an old folk tale, skillfully written, tempered with fine Danish atmosphere, dialogue and nice characterization. The period is 1646-the place Aasol in Denmark. Niels Bruus has returned to the home of his youth as a beggar. He has come to claim his brother's fortune, only to find that he must first establish his identity, since the townspeople have thought him dead by violence these twenty years. They had actually witnessed the execution of the good pastor, Soren Qvist, for the alleged murder. Then comes the long flashback, centering around Anna, the parson's daughter, whom Morten Bruus had loved, and who had been denied him by her father. The pastor was a goodly man, God- fearing, cursed with a terrible anger. Because of this- and a tendency to walk in his sleep- the pastor was convinced, by evidence produced by Morten with intent to revenge himself, that he had killed Niels, though he thought he had simply struck him. In the course of the story you meet others of the townsfolk- and build a keenly alive feeling for time and place and people. And the market? -- Perhaps it is too scholarly to be pure fiction, too tangey for pure scholarship.

Pub Date: N/A

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 1947