Marshall (Look Once, Look Twice, 1995, etc.) uses die-cut illustrations as a tease, for objects glimpsed on the other side...

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BANANA MOON

Marshall (Look Once, Look Twice, 1995, etc.) uses die-cut illustrations as a tease, for objects glimpsed on the other side of a hole are not what they appear: Candy canes turn out to be the sails of sailboats, and salt-water taffy is transformed into the whorls of a turtle's shell. Once readers grasp the conceit, they'll have a ball attempting to figure out what's on the next page, and Marshall imbues each visual riddle with possibilities, so that an ice cream sundae miraculously becomes a red setting sun--the whipped cream is a billowing cloud, the splash of chocolate sauce and the stem of the cherry are wings of birds. The colors are utterly eye-catching and the die-cuts capture small details, e.g., a palm tree is cropped to look like the stem leaves of a peach. The pages of the book are thick and coated, making them durable and easy for small fingers to turn.

Pub Date: May 1, 1998

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Greenwillow

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1998