Like its predecessor, Joi Bangla (1974), this is a handsome collection of profiles (half text, half photos) introducing nine...

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JOVEN PORTUGAL: After the Revolution

Like its predecessor, Joi Bangla (1974), this is a handsome collection of profiles (half text, half photos) introducing nine young people who have lived through recent political upheaval. For single-minded nineteen-year-old bullfighter Antonio Poeira--and, to a lesser extent, for Catholic seminarian Luis da Silva--the Revolution seems a thing apart, and many of the others are unabashedly fuzzy as to what happened and why. But retornado Maria Magalnaes, fifteen, has been uprooted by Angolan independence (the Laures give only the Portuguese settlers' side of this story); wealthy Henrique Carvalho e Silva has become somewhat less privileged since his father had to leave his Angolan plantations; and--at the other extreme, for proud, hard-working Ines Fernandes, a seventeen-year-old of Indian descent who lives in the shantytown barracas and supports her entire family working as a switchboard operator, involvement in the newly legitimate Union of Communist Youth affords a previously unavailable social life. The Laures' sketches are curiously toneless and none are probing; also, however accurate, their dismissive characterization of so many of their subjects as naive betrays an absence of the empathy such an undertaking calls for. Nevertheless the composite picture that emerges is both detailed and broad, and Jason Laure's pointed photos sharpen it considerably.

Pub Date: Aug. 30, 1977

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Farrar, Straus & Giroux

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 1977