The message of Jacobs' dyspeptic and supercilious introduction seems to be that every American but himself cooks wastefully...

READ REVIEW

COOKING FOR ALL IT'S WORTH: Making the Most of Every Morsel of Food You Buy

The message of Jacobs' dyspeptic and supercilious introduction seems to be that every American but himself cooks wastefully and only to show off--yet somehow manages to put together culinary horrors from canned soups and to ostentatiously outdo the best restaurants with elaborate, exotic creations. Cut out Jacobs' own verbal showing off throughout and what you have here (besides a much shorter book) is a system of ""Connective Cookery""--essentially, using calculated leftovers; buying whole chickens and using different parts in different meals; and, the heart of his method but one that requires a good deal of prior effort, keeping a variety of homemade stocks on hand to use in soups, fish, and meat dishes. Most of us, of course, don't have to be reminded that leftover ham is good in soup; and Jacobs strains his concept when he calls for leftover fish fillets or, for feijoada, four cups of leftover cooked beans. ""To cook the beans from a standing start specifically for feijoada is,"" he believes, ""a waste of time""--yet if economical cooking really required all this fussing with consommes and stocks, more of us might be reduced to mixing canned soups.

Pub Date: May 1, 1983

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: McGraw-Hill

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1983