Engaging commentary on far places, as Jean Shor, major league traveler, recounts her journey in Marco Polo's footsteps with...

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AFTER YOU, MARCO POLO

Engaging commentary on far places, as Jean Shor, major league traveler, recounts her journey in Marco Polo's footsteps with a spirit keenly attuned to that of the man who went ""hunting with a hungry heart"". In flashbacks she gives a run through of her earlier excursions,- to Europe as a carefree tourist, in wartime as a Red Cross doughnut pusher, to China for UNRRA where imprisonment afforded a diet of brainwashing and goldfish- and where she met Franc Shor. Result, a honeymoon across the Gobi, a National Geographic assignment, and a take-off from Venice on Marco Polo's route for China. Jean's account is always personal with a balance of levity and determination. In Tehran, she was immune to all but one of the crown jewels- and she won the friendship of the popular and capable young Shah. In Afghanistan she obtained the coveted permission to traverse the Wakhan Corridor through the High Pamirs (where her husband almost died of fever while a Kirghiz poised seemingly ready to seize the spoils) -- and committed the diplomatic error of giving the King a camera. The Shors put their lives into the hands of a highwayman who insured their safety to the Chinese border. But with the flareup of the Communist-Nationalist finale they were forced to change their route to Hunza, the ""happy land of just enough"", where the Rani asked Jean what part cold cream played in American betrothal ceremonies. There's adroit linking of Jean Shor's own response to distant lands with that of Marco Polo's own remarks. And the appeal -by no means only feminine- has many moments that men readers will enjoy.

Pub Date: Oct. 11, 1955

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: McGraw-Hill

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1955