Lighthearted and literate, this comedy's plot may not be equal to Dole's very considerable talent with words and funny...

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VENUS DISARMED

Lighthearted and literate, this comedy's plot may not be equal to Dole's very considerable talent with words and funny dialogue but it has an amusing bounce. In fact, the first-person narrator often writes so well that he must be a writer instead of press secretary to a bumbling Southern Congressman. Representative Wilbur Fonts has vain dreams of ascending to the Presidency. His platform: that the U.S. is behind in the Culture Race. Fonts has a wild notion that he can recover the lost arms of the Venus de Milo and bring them to the White House. With a small task force of brilliant young men and his virgin ecretary, he follows the trail of the lost arms through London, Paris and Cannes, meanwhile uncovering a few murders. Gorgeous girls show up as well as General de Gaulle. The story is something of a makeshift for hanging portraits of British and French comic types and for traveller's impressions. One hilarious moment has a befuddled American in London who can't understand the dialect and has to ask directions in French. Some of the dialogue is an actor's dream.

Pub Date: May 12, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Crown

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1966