Not an exhaustive nor appraising nor doting biography, but a summation of a black leader's progress. A. Philip Randolph, one...

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A. PHILIP RANDOLPH: A Biographical Portrait

Not an exhaustive nor appraising nor doting biography, but a summation of a black leader's progress. A. Philip Randolph, one of America's most accountable and enduring figures, is now in the twilight of his life -- a journey which began in Crescent City, Florida, where Asa was born in 1889 and progressed in sedulous paces from street-corner radicalism in the Harlem of World War I ferment to the organization of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters during the following decades to the climactic March on Washington in the early '60's which kindled a nation's conscience against racism. Anderson, a New Yorker staff writer, is particularly effective when recounting Randolph's stormy relationships with other prominent black personalities like W. E. B. DuBois (they dashed when DuBois supported the First World War effort while Randolph was editorializing in his Messenger that ""No intelligent Negro is willing to lay down his life for the United States as it now exists"") and of course the vituperative dispute with Marcus Garvey over the future of American negritude. This irreducible man, who has been involved in one way or another in all of the major civil rights battles of this century as well as a goodly number of skirmishes, deserves every appreciative assumption in this let-the-facts-speak-for-themselves valedictory.

Pub Date: March 28, 1973

ISBN: 0520055055

Page Count: -

Publisher: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1973