A silly salmagundi assembled from both legitimate and shadier studies of animal behavior. Yes, yes, we all agree, animals...

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YOUR PET'S SECRET LANGUAGE: How To Understand It and Speak It

A silly salmagundi assembled from both legitimate and shadier studies of animal behavior. Yes, yes, we all agree, animals can talk -- something Dr. Dolittle pointed out years ago -- and yes, yes, we all know about Washoe the chimp and the revolutionary studies now going on in the field. But we did not know about the dog and cat who are office receptionists for a Parisian vet; or the French poodle who barks yes and no, or the parrot who snitched on a robber. Much of the advice on training is sound -- and familiar: use quiet periods for serious lessons, watch your tone of voice, respect the animal, etc. But the author really does not distinguish between ""training"" and just casual conversation. There is also an uncritical presentation of a ""vocabulary list"" for dogs and cats and a glossary of animal body language. ""Don't invite those pesky people over again"" is indicated by various canine signs: ""The body sways from left to right. The eyes are opened wide and the ears are up. . . . Sometimes a slight discharge of saliva is noticed . . . ."" And your bird wishing to convey ""I suddenly feel alarmed"" may ""issue a sharp, insistent cry."" And after perusing what will undoubtedly be a highly touted and durable talk show item, the statement ""I feel there are more reliable animal communication books"" may be conveyed by the head nodding north to south with a slight discharge of CO.

Pub Date: April 28, 1975

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Peter H. Wyden/McKay

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1975