Harriet Sherman fills her pages with luminescent color, two-dimensional patterns and broadly mugging people, and this brash...

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THE WONDERFUL LAMP FROM ISFAHAN

Harriet Sherman fills her pages with luminescent color, two-dimensional patterns and broadly mugging people, and this brash combination is well suited to the tone and locale of Jo Framayan's modern Persian tale. It's too bad, however, that the road-aloud audience -- most likely to be wowed by the antics of Sherman's leering electric blue goat -- will probably not be inclined to sit still through the rambling, overlong tale of how an exasperated Prince summons a magician and genie to transform his gardener's obnoxious pet into a uniformed school bus driver for his 32 children. Farmayan evokes the more charming contradictions of life in a wealthy contemporary Persian family with enthusiasm. And though the real characters (the Prince and his brood are drawn from life) and the whimsical situation are pieced together flimsily, Sherman's high impact artwork and roguish good humor helps smooth over the rough spots.

Pub Date: May 6, 1974

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: McGraw-Hill

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1974