Lingard's The Second Flowering of Emily Mountjoy (1979), although offering occasional color and verve, had a leaden...

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GREENYARDS

Lingard's The Second Flowering of Emily Mountjoy (1979), although offering occasional color and verve, had a leaden undertone of preachment; and this stolid romance, set in mid-19th-century Scotland when enclosures were driving tenant farmers from their ancestral lands, has a monotonic earnestness. Catriona Ross, of father unknown and a dying insane mother, lives with her uncle and his family in Greenyards, a green rural land soon to be ""cleared."" And directing this eviction will be glowering factor Gillanders, who's in the employ of the greedy landowner. But why does Gillanders scrutinize Catriona in such a sinister manner whenever they meet? Catriona worries about this--and also about her passion for fiery Donald Munro, who's engaged to Catriona's nice cousin Janet. (Catriona nobly refuses to let Donald break his vows.) Then, on the day of the eviction, five women are beaten near to death--including Catriona, who's rescued from jail, and possibly death, by Edinburgh doctor Will Cruickshank. Will proposes. Catriona accepts, But she's pregnant by Donald, and, prompted by Gillanders' wife (who had once loved WiLl), Catriona sets out to join her family in Canada. She never gets there, however, and, some hardships later, Will finds her; they marry and begin Good Works in Will's Edinburgh home surgery. Happy ending? No, not yet. Because Donald now re-enters the picture, unmarried; and Catriona, who's borne him a son, must decide between passion and the goodness of just plain Will. Sturdy, unsalted porridge--for domestic costume-drama readers of only the very plainest tastes.

Pub Date: Feb. 18, 1980

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Putnam

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1980