A pair of recent graduates tell you more than you probably want to know about the transformation of Notre Dame from a...

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HESBURGH'S NOTRE DAME

A pair of recent graduates tell you more than you probably want to know about the transformation of Notre Dame from a bastion of old-fashioned Catholic education to a model of liberalism and academic excellence, at least as measured against most other Catholic universities. In 1960 Notre Dame stood firmly in loco parentis -- lights out at 11 P.M. (perforce, since the electricity was turned off in the residence halls), forbidden books locked up in the library, and Father Hesburgh very much in control of a submissive student body. By 1972 Hesburgh was still president, but everything else had changed -- the social rules had gone the way of the Great Auk, Hesburgh was on record against the Vietnam war and political protest was the liturgy of the day. Hesburgh is an intriguing figure, if only as one of the survivors of the wave of campus disturbances that toppled so many college presidents, and all the refrains of the '60's from ending the war to student power are in evidence here, but the endless detail about day-to-day events at Notre Dame makes this of primarily local interest.

Pub Date: Oct. 10, 1972

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Hawthorn

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1972