A useful book for individuals who want to understand estate planning in depth. But Barnes lets his strong bias against...

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WHO TO TRUST WITH YOUR MONEY

A useful book for individuals who want to understand estate planning in depth. But Barnes lets his strong bias against lawyers and the legal profession overtake his purpose. For example, he implies that most lawyers would rather recommend a form of property ownership that will provide legal probate fees than an ownership form that would keep assets out of probate. Readers would be better served if the book focused on how to find the right attorney. Barnes does not, however, put other financial professionals under the same microscope. In fact, he alludes often to a sound recommendation made by a competent financial planner without discussing how the client got together with the planner. And little attention is given to the motivations of these money managers. For example, Barnes overlooks the fact that many financial planners will recommend a ""load"" mutual fund (in which they earn commissions) rather than a comparable ""no-load"" fund in which they would not. Over half the book is related to estate-planning topics, including probate, types of ownership, wills, and trusts. Subjects such as mutual funds, stocks and bonds are scanted. In sum, some benefit to individuals who need a working knowledge of estate planning. A reader who already doesn't trust lawyers will really enjoy the book; readers who need true financial expertise should look elsewhere.

Pub Date: Oct. 22, 1985

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Morrow

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 1985