As if the story of Captain John Smith and Pocahontas were not, in itself, sufficiently fantastic, Bowman, a motion picture...

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POWHATAN'S DAUGHTER

As if the story of Captain John Smith and Pocahontas were not, in itself, sufficiently fantastic, Bowman, a motion picture and TV writer, undertakes its further embellishment in this historical romance. Pocahontas was just a child of twelve or thirteen when she saved Smith's life, not once, but twice. For his good luck and/or good management in dealing with the tribes Smith was offered a nation of his own, and Pocahontas, by her father, Powhatan. He was wounded in an accident, however, and had to return to England where he remained for several years. Pocahontas, meanwhile, had been married to John Rolfe, as a symbol of the alliance between the English and Powhatan's tribes. She was brought to the court of King James as a Princess and she and Smith were reunited -- briefly, for she died of an infection soon after. She was then just 21. Smith, of course, went on to further glories. Presumably, there are those who find the fictionalizing of this type of ""legendary"" history charming. But if you feel -- to take one example -- that the spectacle, whether real or fancied, of this young foreigner being ""toasted"" (along with the memory of ""Will"") in the Mermaid Tavern by such Elizabethan worthies as Ben Jonson is only demeaning, then this book is not your tankard of ale.

Pub Date: Jan. 1, 1973

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Viking

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1973