A successful director, scenarist and movie entrepreneur, Brom had what he considered the startlingly original idea of...

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THE PITILESS JUNGLE

A successful director, scenarist and movie entrepreneur, Brom had what he considered the startlingly original idea of filming in Darkest Africa itself a story depicting the brotherhood of man within the all-embracing bonds of Nature. The outcome of all this hokum and egotism results in this book allegedly scratched off during Brom's random respites ""on truck seats"" or ""under the shade of an age-old baobab tree"". Brom, or rather John Hogarth as he calls himself in his third person narrative, landed in Africa with a party of 7 men and women, and they all met with the time-honored torments of Equatorial life- insects, wild animals and the petty rivalries of Colonial officialdom; they also encountered the natives, their ""weird"" customs and tribal dances. The author himself manages to get lost in the jungle but all ends splendidly- and Africa remains ""unchanging, enigmatic, incalculable"" although one can't see precisely why it is any of these things. Perhaps the movie, which will have the same title as the book, will be better than the book.

Pub Date: May 20, 1955

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: David McKay

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1955