In the last book he wrote before his death, John Lewellen, who had achieved eminence as an author of scientific books for...

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TEE VEE HUMPHREY

In the last book he wrote before his death, John Lewellen, who had achieved eminence as an author of scientific books for boys and girls, such as Jet Transports, Birds and Planes: How They Fly, etc. turned for the first time to fiction. Unfortunately, this broadly farcical wish-fulfillment story of Tee Vee Humphrey and his desire to become a TV personality, is never quite convincing. Not unlike the recent Linda Goes to A TV Studio, in this story a chain of quite unlikely coincidences puts fifth grade Humphrey in line to become master of ceremonies of The Animal Shop program. Some of his escapades are comical; most seem contrived. For example, as prop boy he errs when he takes a taxi to a remote farm to buy an empty milk bottle for one program, with a resultant and unexpected $15 taxi bill. In effect this plot talks down to the reader's intelligence -- for few fifth graders are that unsheltered from every day economics. Unrealistic.

Pub Date: Aug. 19, 1957

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 1957