This is a portrayal of an English village and its community through the medium of essays of persons and places. Moore...

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THE FAIR FIELD

This is a portrayal of an English village and its community through the medium of essays of persons and places. Moore creates Elmbury, its one mansion, its slums, its country lanes, its Norman tower, its favored fishing spot, the surrounding hamlet, etc. And he peoples the farms with Cobbetts and young gallants, the pubs with Falstaffs, the alleys with Pistols and Bardolphs and Nyms, the school with Mr. Chips, the slums with Hogarthian figures. Covering the period 1913-1944, the essays show the transition from war to peace to war, prosperity and depression,-in short, all the staying power of Elmbury village. Conscious of his literary heritage, Moore writes with warmth and vigor and presents England, perhaps too deliberately, in its best tradition. The writing is sensitive, in the Galsworthy manner.

Pub Date: Nov. 22, 1946

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1946