The drama of a man's life and circumstances of contemporary history form a powerful combination in a book that gains impact...

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THE CAPTAIN LEAVES HIS SHIP

The drama of a man's life and circumstances of contemporary history form a powerful combination in a book that gains impact to the closing page and then bursts beyond it. Captain Cwiklinski pictures the Poland of his childhood and youth, the village in which he knew foreign domination and for a time freedom. His education as a seaman led to the ship life that found him in London when Hitler invaded Poland. Hemmed in Holland for the war years, he learned of his wife's death and later remarried. With freedom he hastened to work for his country, first for the Exile Government and then with the strikes of the crew for the Warsaw, Communist-run government. It was as Captain of the that he encountered the insidious forces of Communism in terms of spies and informers, infiltration of the crew, his own calls by the U.B. men. The stories of crew desertion in free ports, of doctors' sabotaging, of Eisler's escape which Cwiklinski countered but which cost him the trust of both Communists and the New York port gradually build to the final warning by a loyal crew member that this is the captain's last trip -- he faces charges of espionage on return to Poland. Cwiklinski's escape and dedication to the freeing of his country as a part of ""Poland in Exile"" concludes a convincing, appealing book by a patriot, whose family and friends in Poland might well take proud in.

Pub Date: Jan. 20, 1954

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1954