Mr. Vandercook penetrates the Fiji Islands, the New Guinea bush and the Solomons for ""the fun of it"" though now and again...

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DARK ISLANDS

Mr. Vandercook penetrates the Fiji Islands, the New Guinea bush and the Solomons for ""the fun of it"" though now and again he wondered if he had been led astray, when he and his wife were caught in an open river boat in a tremendous storm, with cocoanut shells to bail. He tells some amusing and strange stories of the natives and the whites, of people on shipboard. He had no harrowing experiences, but for people who like pleasant accounts of strange places and people, it is interesting enough. On the whole, however, it is a conventional, somewhat superficial book, with a personal flavor, whether the writer tells of meeting a race of head-hunters, or of pet owls, or of a parrot who tore shoe laces and nibbled his wife's ear.

Pub Date: Oct. 20, 1937

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Harper

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1937