A continuation of the trilogy begun in The Cypresses Believe in God, this fantastically complex novel takes up the story of...

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ONE MILLION DEAD

A continuation of the trilogy begun in The Cypresses Believe in God, this fantastically complex novel takes up the story of the Alvear family during the three years of the Spanish Civil War, 1936-39. Family members undergo permanent changes of character as the cities and the very landscape become strewn with horrors and bitter disillusion. Though the novel begins in Gerona, the fratricidal conflict soon expands and is viewed by the author from both sides impartially. With dizzying exhaustiveness, Gironella loads his pages with more characters than any reader could reasonably be expected to remember without the scorecard that has actually been attached as a glossary. The story begins with young Ignacio Alvear's dawn visit to the Gerona cemetery where he discovers his older brother Cesar's body among a vast of corpses. With that grim episode as a touchstone, the book builds bit by bit into a tragic panorama and mosaic of misery, rapidly flashing from one corner of the and to another something in the manner of Dos Passos' U.S.A. and Sartre's Troubled . While the monumental sadness of One Million Dead is impressive, as is the author's love for Reds and Nationalists alike, his one million facts have a monotone of objectivity that is wearying.

Pub Date: Oct. 11, 1963

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1963