There will probably be numerous take-offs on various war agencies, such as Weldman's Too Early To Tell (Reynal & Hitchcock,...

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THE LONG PURSUIT

There will probably be numerous take-offs on various war agencies, such as Weldman's Too Early To Tell (Reynal & Hitchcock, page 555). Now comes this, a satirical expose of a USO show, called, for purposes of camouflage, The Five Star Chat. A certain well-known and popular quiz show, plus a strip tease artiste who has written a melodrama may feel a bit squeamish at the vitriolic attack on some scenes behind the scenes of a show on tour of the post-war front. But the caricaturing of personalities is so exaggerated that the whole emerges with nightmare qualities that destroy the validity of the plot, a plot which revolves around the neuroticism of the egocentric producer, jealous of his ""stars"", violent in his hates, and with but one purpose- to catch up with the girl who is trying to escape him. The author has made The Hucksters read like a nursery tale of sex- and the reader gets more than a little fed up with the male in search of a lay-just any lay. The book, to put it frankly, bored me even more than it disgusted me.

Pub Date: N/A

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Rinehart

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 1947