Unfortunately an uninspired raco-problem book, for although an unusual angle is offered, it doesn't build up to much feeling...

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ANCHOR MAN

Unfortunately an uninspired raco-problem book, for although an unusual angle is offered, it doesn't build up to much feeling of reality. It centers around Clarence Duke, a Negro who spurns the acceptance of a white community, because he is too embittered against whites to live in harmony with them. A fire forces a white high school (with only one Negro boy student) to admit a group of Negroes, and Clarence, one of the ""burnt out"" children, is among them. He hates all whites because his brother was cheated by a white boxing manager. His precariously flashy adjustment to the white group, as a valuable team member, is upset when the prejudiced principal unfairly suspends Duke for a time, thereby proving to Duke that all white men are his enemies. He is a foil for Charley, a Negro who is happy and accepted in the white section. Eventually Duke admits that Charley has not gone against his people through his acceptance of the advantages offered by others. Since comparatively few, if any, white communities have opened their doors freely to Negroes, this book seems to dwell on a fairly theoretical aspect of the problem, especially unreal to the age level for which this book is written. In any case, not a very engaging book.

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 1947

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Harper

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1947