The final novel in Cary's trilogy which included Prisoner of Grace and Except the Lord. Like the others the story is told...

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NOT HONOUR MORE

The final novel in Cary's trilogy which included Prisoner of Grace and Except the Lord. Like the others the story is told through the eyes of one person, this time Nina's second husband, James Latter, a retired captain in the British army, and deals with Nina Nimmo Latter and Chester Nimmo, now Lord Nimmo, in their last days, during the General Strike in England. It would seem to depend on its predecessors for the full impact. Nimmo, now seventy, is trying to stage a comeback in politics and is living with the Latters in Devon, with Nina acting as secretary. As the book opens, Latter tries to shoot Nimmo on finding him in a compromising position with Nina. From then on, the book is a working out of a combination political, psychological and ""romantic"" triangle against a background of unrest and violence. Latter finally solves his own confused private salvation and writes this record to justify himself. Essentially, though there are moments of intense action, this is a novel of character, and viewed on its own, is weak. Latter's character is well done; Nimmo's reads like a cliche of a political and religious demagogue without memory of the earlier books, while Nina is foggily motivated indeed. Nevertheless, to those who feel Cary an important writer, this is essential reading for those who read the other two.

Pub Date: May 25, 1955

ISBN: 1842320351

Page Count: -

Publisher: Harper

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1955