The author and his wife cross some of the trails that they discovered in The Lost Towns and Roads of America (1961, p. 148)...

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THE LAST OF THE MIDDLE WEST

The author and his wife cross some of the trails that they discovered in The Lost Towns and Roads of America (1961, p. 148) but while that was a chancy, hit or miss journey, this is a planned excursion. And the excitement generated by the ""discoveries"" in the first book is noticeably lacking here. Actually it is an admitted search for a Midwest that is no longer there as he views old towns, old landmarks, gazes at crumbling statues and confines pleasantries primarily to the older generation. And then there are histories and legends and a number of reminiscences about Mr. Humphreys' boyhood en route from Michigan to Iowa. Midwesterners love the dollar and the car and the landscape is varied and the author has quite a few friends and relatives scattered about and there were heroes and great writers and artists from this area. It's an informal, pleasant enough trip but the interest and audience will hardly be as sizable as the landscape.

Pub Date: May 6, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1966