A big collection of articles with full scholarly trappings. The editors' guiding theme seems to be Control Through...

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PROTEST!

A big collection of articles with full scholarly trappings. The editors' guiding theme seems to be Control Through Understanding. Hence the emphasis on administrative response to ""protest."" For some reason there are case studies of Indiana, Ohio State, Princeton and Colorado, but not Berkeley, Harvard, or Columbia; San Francisco State, Howard, and Wisconsin fail to fill the gap. A short piece by ex-National Student Association President Ed Schwartz is coyly featured without reference to his prominent role in the CIA-fund scandal. This is somewhat indicative of the tone of many of the contributors. . . which is not to deny, for instance, that Clark Kerr's essay represents an intelligent overview in its way. The book's most worthwhile section, and one which least displays the containment disposition, offers articles on the protesters themselves: ""what is known and What is said,"" backgrounds, values, academic standing, aspirations. Here the ""activism scales"" and ""input variables"" mean something (if not always what they purport). And at least two essays (Flacks on the social bases of the student movement and Westby and Braungart on utopian/dystopian conceptions among different sorts of activists) are truly valuable. Other authors include Garson, Morgan, Astin and the editors. There is a long bibliography. There Will be a sure demand.

Pub Date: Jan. 19, 1969

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Morrow

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1969