An inconclusive story of suburban New York (Darian, perhaps?) and the perfidies and infidelities of the smart set,...

READ REVIEW

THE TRAIN FROM PITTSBURGH

An inconclusive story of suburban New York (Darian, perhaps?) and the perfidies and infidelities of the smart set, superficially ""respected and respectable"" couples who accept each others affairs with aplomb. Tom is an advertising executive, with a bit of conscience about society; Ellen is facing an immediate break with her lover in order to let Tom think the child she is carrying is his. And everything comes to a head on the day of a party they are throwing,- Tom goes on a binge to steel himself to break with Ellen, in order to marry Jean -- and finds the effort too much for him. And through the pattern of his day he is haunted by the realization that he must face up to something else- he has promised a job to Mike Meyers- and Mike and his little family are hurtling east on ""the train from Pittsburgh"" and Tom's chief has stood pat on the ""matter of policy""- no Jews hired. The realization of his inadequacy makes Tom look back on the war and his sense of a strengthening link with Mike. The story is told in flashes- present, past, imagined future, and much of it through a fog of drunkenness which blurs his senses, his vision. Even the end leaves both Tom and the reader with a bit of hangover. But Julian Farren can write; he's modern and glib and too facile- but he may grow up.

Pub Date: Feb. 24, 1948

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1948