A new entry in the ""World Leaders Past & Present"" series that's an often moving account of a ""god-king"" on earth, exiled...

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TENZIN GYATSO: The Dalai Lama

A new entry in the ""World Leaders Past & Present"" series that's an often moving account of a ""god-king"" on earth, exiled from his own land. An innocent-looking five-year-old stares from the first-page photo, and while that face loses its youth over the coupe of the next 100 pages, much of its wide-eyed naivet‚ remains. The child who would become the 14th Dalai Lama of the people of Tibet, newly named Tenzin Gyatso, was ""discovered"" at age two to be the reincarnation of the 13th Dalai Lama; soon after, his years of study and meditation began. As an adult, he tried to tread a time line between pleasing the Chinese authorities occupying Tibet and fulfilling his spiritual role. Eventually, he fled to India, where he established Tibetan communities and began his work of letting the rest of the world know of Tibet's plight. The text here is occasionally dry, condensing vast historical context into short passages, yet it almost always fascinates. Like Emperor Hirohito, Tenzin Gyatso has a unique role among his people, a supreme being walking on earth as a mortal. Friese paints the Dalai Lama as a man who may or may not believe this aspect of his life, but who recognizes what his people believe and therefore behaves accordingly. Buddhism is presented in crisp, understandable terms. A thoroughly respectable portrait up to March 1989, when the Dalai Lama won the Nobel Peace Prize. Further reading; chronology; index.

Pub Date: Dec. 1, 1989

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: 112

Publisher: Chelsea House

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 15, 1989