The talented creator of a miniature epic of Indian village life in Nectar a Sieve (reported 2/1/55- p. 98) turns to the...

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SOME INNER FURY

The talented creator of a miniature epic of Indian village life in Nectar a Sieve (reported 2/1/55- p. 98) turns to the pre-1947 urban scene for a novel fabricated upon the complexities of Indian life touched by Europeanization and a growing desire for freedom. Again her heroine speaks for her -- here in the form of a lovely, perceptive young woman of high caste, who falls in love with an Englishman whom her Oxford educated brother, Kit, brings home on a visit. When Richard first enters the household of the dashing Kit, he has no awareness -- in the faint ripple on the life of Mira and her family- of the lashing storm that ultimately break over them and forces the lovers asunder, each to assert a loyalty that cannot be denied for his own people. But before this comes to a head, Mira and Richard experience a full love; Kit marries the sweet, shy Prem whom Govind, the lowering stepbrother whose path has led him to nationalist terrorism, loves deeply; Mira works for the paper under a dynamic woman leader, Roshan, often jailed for the cause of freedom. The storm of personal and political passions breaks when Prem and Kit fall victims, separately, in a terrorist executed fire that burns the mission school, while a court, indifferent to justice, drives the wedge deeper between British and Indian. Again there is the sensitivity, the cumulative effect that characterized the earlier book. But it is married for readers by lack of clarity in coming to grips with the real issues behind the court action, the motives that forced the British actions. One misses the richness, the sense of inevitability, the impact of the earlier book, while recognizing that this is superior to most novels in the field.

Pub Date: March 12, 1956

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: John Day

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1956