The story of two Chicago nurses trying to make it in independent practice--unfocused and often superficial, but of interest...

READ REVIEW

ON OUR OWN

The story of two Chicago nurses trying to make it in independent practice--unfocused and often superficial, but of interest nonetheless. After years of working together on a psychiatric ward, Gibson and Catterson gradually began, in the early 1970s, to look for alternatives to the familiar nursing-career bugaboos: poor pay, hassles from the hospital administration, lack of respect from physicians, overly-complacent colleagues, no outlet for initiative. Their answer was to establish an independent nursing practice: Registered Professional Nurses, P.C. In Illinois, among other states, nurses may legally offer care to patients (not medical diagnosis or treatment) without any affiliation with physicians or institutions; Gibson and Catterson provided blood-pressure checks, home nursing care, and, in several cases, counseling for those with psychiatric problems. They intended to keep their hospital jobs (the practice was barely self-supporting), but as their business grew, so did opposition from the hospital nursing directors; eventually, the two were fired. The lawsuit they instituted to clear their names (charging sex discrimination) and the assistance they received from women's groups are threaded through the book--with a very heavy hand. What became of their practice, however, we never learn. The message seems to be that if these two middle-class, Middle-American women finally saw the light of the women's lib movement, then readers will too. What is totally lacking is an introductory statement of purpose--the authors just plow right in, and hence will lose readers along the way.

Pub Date: Feb. 6, 1980

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: St. Martin's

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1980