Historians may question if Mercy Otis Warren deserves the title of ""First Lady of the Revolution"" bestowed on her by the...

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FIRST LADY OF THE REVOLUTION

Historians may question if Mercy Otis Warren deserves the title of ""First Lady of the Revolution"" bestowed on her by the author, biographer of many women (Susan B. Anthony, Dolly Madison, Marie Antoinette, etc.); few will quarrel with Miss Anthony's handling of her subject. Playwright, pamphleteer, historian and intense patriot, Mercy Otis, one of 13 children, was born in 1728 in Barnstable, Mass. of a noted and able family; her adored brother James Otis was known as ""The Patriot"" for his violent opposition to British rule and his slogan ""Taxation without Representation."" Highly intellectual, a writer born, Mercy married James Warren of Plymouth, Harvard graduate and enlightened patriot; while still a girl she wrote poems and poetical plays and in the Revolution satirical plays circulated as patriotic pamphlets, among them the bawdy and anonymous The Blockheads and The Motley Assembly. The friend of many of the famous men and women of her time, among them John and Abigail Adams, with her husband she played a part in framing the Constitution; in 1805 she published her History of the American Revolution about which her biographer says little; she died in 1814. Carefully documented and written with characteristic clarity, telling the story of Mercy's husband and family as well as of herself, the book is a valuable addition to American Revolutionary history and biography and should find a place on the shelves of public and lending libraries as well as in historical collections; its greatest appeal will be to students of the Revolution and of New England history.

Pub Date: Oct. 2, 1958

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1958