An extremely readable story of a Hollywood build-up, with lots of fascinating detail about promotion stunts, making of...

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REMEMBER VALERIE MARCH

An extremely readable story of a Hollywood build-up, with lots of fascinating detail about promotion stunts, making of pictures, etc., which the movie fans will swallow whole. It is one of the few books about Hollywood which seems to have credibility, for most of them have tried to out-Hollywood Hollywood by extravaganzing the freakish, lunatic aspects of the tinsel town. Then, too, the author has style (a rare commodity these days), and a sense of narrative timing. There's a suggestion of the O'Hara school, not as tight, but with that pace and slickness. The story is told of the man who made Valerie March (nee Peggy Higgins, a little tramp from a middle west dump heap, with no brains, little beauty, and an amazing vitality and emotional intensity). She gets to the top -- and then is pushed beyond her medium and is ruined. Her private life is there too. It is not high class stuff, but there's an impact in the telling and the sense of atmosphere that characterized Young Man With A Horn. And it has a chance for a more permanent place than I Lost My Girlish Laughter, the last Hollywood success.

Pub Date: May 1, 1939

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1939