A Mexican tale retold in a simple vocabulary, this illustrates a clever device for the punishment of those who would justify...

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ONE GOOD DEED DESERVES ANOTHER

A Mexican tale retold in a simple vocabulary, this illustrates a clever device for the punishment of those who would justify repaying good with evil. Bright pictures and easy text follow the fugitive bandit Ruffo who was saved after falling over a cliff. He rewarded the family who rescued him with a demand for their burro and their money. When they point out how unfair he is, Ruffo selfishly replies, ""That may be so, but I am hungry and I must get away."" He grudgingly allows them to get one outside opinion on his behavior and the first boy they meet says he can't decide unless the whole scene is re-enacted. Ruffo, caught up in his own defense, again takes a dive over the cliff, but this time he is left dangling there until an arresting officer arrives. Satisfying, slyly achieved poetic justice. The author's last was the equally well done The Nice That Ate Iron.

Pub Date: June 1, 1964

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Whitman

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 1964