In a sport filled with legends, Paige carved a unique niche for himself as pitcher, show-man, and also as one of the major...

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SATCHEL PAIGE

In a sport filled with legends, Paige carved a unique niche for himself as pitcher, show-man, and also as one of the major figures in the breakdown of baseball's color barrier. Paige came from a large, poor family, spent most of his teen-age years in reform school, pitched until he was over 70--in thousands of games, for dozens of teams, in several countries, under contract or free-lance--and was at one point the highest pÄid player is baseball. In 1934, he played on a white semipro team. As Humphrey points out, he faced white major-leaguers many times in exhibition games, thus giving fans a chance to get used to seeing blacks and whites on the same field; and in his heyday he was generally acknowledged to be at least as good as any pitcher in ""organized"" baseball. The author gives a good sense of both his incredible abilities and his free-spirited, irressponsible personality. Occasional black-and-white photos show the erect, lanky Paige both on and off the field; a statistical summary plus a short list of baseball fiction and nonfiction titles are appended. A good, long-overdue replacement for Rubin's Satchel Paige (1974). Index.

Pub Date: March 1, 1988

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: 128

Publisher: Watts

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 15, 1988