The tremendous success of Human Destiny opens the way to a large popular- as well as scientific- sale for this, which,...

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THE ROAD TO REASON

The tremendous success of Human Destiny opens the way to a large popular- as well as scientific- sale for this, which, though written seven years before, provides fuller comprehension of the steps by which Dr. du Nouy arrived at his conclusions, and an introduction to those to whom Human Destiny is still unread. His view of Science as the handmaid of man, the instrument for formulating the solution of human problems, might well appeal to those who have been reading Lindbergh's of Flight and Life. He views, in terms understandable by the layman, the impact of science on humanity, the objectives, methods, problems of interpretation, etc. with the one point recurring, time and again, that it is significant only because of the relation to a thinking instrument- man. Both knowledge and imagination are required for progress, and he outlines the cycle of human progress:- man turns to the war lords and the priests for direction; the priests conquer the war lords and in turn become enemies of revolution; revolution takes over and suppresses the priests, and through them religion. And today- in the midst of revolution- the future foundation of world security rests upon moral health, the crisis today is a moral crisis. Humanity has lagged behind science; knowledge is mistaken for judgment; spiritual power has lost intellectual prestige by not accepting the power- and control- of science, which Dr. du Nouy acknowledges, is solid in its observation, fragile in its interpretation. In his ignorance man has overlooked the directive forces; to attain the essentials of moral health, he must accept a supra-scientific interpretation, and return to religion...Here is an ""idea book"" which provides challenge and consolation. On du Nouy's name, its sales potential is great. But it's no tabloid panacea for lazy readers.

Pub Date: Nov. 17, 1948

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Longmans, Green

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1948