Preliminary to the ""easy"" is a thorough grounding in knowledge of equipment, terminology, names of ingredients, and the...

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THE EASY WAY TO CHINESE COOKING

Preliminary to the ""easy"" is a thorough grounding in knowledge of equipment, terminology, names of ingredients, and the basic methods of Chinese cooking. Once these are mastered, the recipes and instructions seem simple enough. But one cannot assume knowledge- without study- (provided in opening chapters) that ""Chow"" means stir frying at high temperatures; that ""Jing"" means wet steaming; that ""Red Cooking"" involves soy sauce. The how-to of the methods is aided by graphic- if not decorative-line drawings and diagrams, and by pictures- in line -- of the ingredients. Very helpful are the brief notes on how to judge freshness, how to store and prepare. Time is an essential; one cannot prepare Chinese meals in a jiffy. But suggestions of combinations -- fewer ishes and larger quantities than served in restaurants, and for adapting Chinese foods to American kitchens will indicate some short cuts. The book ends with a list of stores carrying Chinese foods.

Pub Date: Oct. 4, 1963

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1963