The Lost Pharoahs (Philosophical- 1951) revealed this commentator's enthusiasm for his subject, and now he enlarges on his...

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THE MOUNTAINS OF PHARAOHS

The Lost Pharoahs (Philosophical- 1951) revealed this commentator's enthusiasm for his subject, and now he enlarges on his material to present a broader analysis of the pyramids of the Giza plateau. On every page his passion for his subject is contagious, his ability to present it in lively fashion apparent. As a history of archeological development the study should find wide layman interest. Cottrell begins with an imaginary visit to the pryamids in the 7th century BC. By then the Egyptians were already an ancient people, and the pryamids stood only as tight lipped guardians of the past from which no one could obtain any answer. The first vaguely informative comments to come down to the relatively modern world were those of Herodotus, and Cottrell, in his turn, comments as liberally on Herodotus as on later observers and explorers, from the early Arabs through the beginnings of modern archeology with Howard- Vyse, on up to the recent discoveries,- the sun boat and the buried pyramid of Sekem Khet. Trailing diggers and scientists through books and first hand reports (he writes of the latest discoveries from his own observation), Cottrell quotes, selects and analyses. The result are some suspensefully sustained and evolved mysteries of the ages, as well as a sense of participation in the history of dynastic Egypt.

Pub Date: April 23, 1956

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Rinehart

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1956