Wolf, who recorded the Voices of the Love Generation and sometimes seems equally strung out, has conducted a rather...

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A DREAM OF DRACULA: In Search of the Living Dead

Wolf, who recorded the Voices of the Love Generation and sometimes seems equally strung out, has conducted a rather self-indulgent search through a darker psycho-sexual domain for the figure who is the ""avatar of our age"" with a ""hydropic thirst"" for the blood of young women. When first met ""Dr. Wolf"" is in bed in Berkeley his ""groin...mercifully at rest"" with the rest of him, when he is visited by a wild young couple. Toward the end he advertises for a real vampire. In between he wanders through Transylvania, spends time (hard to justify in this connection) with a doctor trying to salvage cancer victims, speculates on the ""gasping validity"" of hot red blood, and covers a lot more interesting literary ground--in fact Wolf's referrals from The Sensuous Woman to Emily Dickinson, from Chaucer to Baudelaire are a marvel of mobility. At greater length and with greater relevance are the studies of Matthew Lewis' The Monk, Walpole's Castle of Otranto and Stoker's masterpiece, and presumably Wolf is trying to relate vampirism in general with the ""symbolic sexual power of death."" All of this wander-bloodlust seems vaguely unspecific unless it might be to speculate ""whether a writer is not a quintessential voyeur."" Or panderer to an age which has resurrected Dracula with such contemporary wild growths as Manson and Anton LeVey.

Pub Date: Nov. 29, 1972

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Little, Brown

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1972