This is a supplementary (which does not infer optional) book about the very different world in which children live-- one...

READ REVIEW

LIFE AMONG THE GIANTS

This is a supplementary (which does not infer optional) book about the very different world in which children live-- one which is not only disregarded by those who are not only bigger and better but those who also have forgotten the quality of childhood, so well illumined here. In a child, feelings are strong and spontaneous and translatable into direct action and often anarchy; children are often immoral (morality has to be acquired), literal, irrefutably logical. Dr. Young (Wednesday's Children -1964) writes about some of the conceptual impasses between adults and children: death, which is rather a question of disappearance or erasure for the child; time-- ""how much is later?""; language; and some of the primary values, dignity, privacy, authority, love. As such it is an illustration rather than a reconciliation of the two worlds, full of small object lessons which are disconcerting, discomfiting, amusing, touching, but always relevant. Parents, Dr. Young says, do not ""listen""; they do not always read either but they should read this. It's good.

Pub Date: March 15, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: McGraw-Hill

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1966