This is not, in the usual sense, an autobiography, though one can draw from it the main thread of the events in Louis...

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MY AMERICA: 1928-1938

This is not, in the usual sense, an autobiography, though one can draw from it the main thread of the events in Louis Adamic's personal life between the two dates indicated, so that with The Native's Return one has a fairly complete picture of one man's adaptation to his new country as well as his new perspective on his land. Personally, this book seems to me more in the nature of an analysis of America as it appears to Louis Adamic, who makes himself a sounding board for the turmoil of social, political, economic and human happenings of a decade. He goes back into the causes, as for example in his study of the MacNamara case in Los Angeles as ground-work for subsequent approach to the changes in the labor set-up of recent years. The text is filled with human interest material, with pen portraits of some of the important figures in our national life, with word studies of all sorts and conditions of men and women, met in his travels the country over. Taken as a whole, it is an extraordinarily full and vibrant picture of the dominant rhythms of today. There are some phases almost completely ignored, but the relations of capital and labor, the race problems, these are challenges to every native born American. The book is uneven in interest and importance, episodic and at times fragmentary in method, but undoubtedly will prove one of the most discussed books of the late Spring season.

Pub Date: May 25, 1938

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Harper

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1938