Mr. Brownlow, now seventy-five years old, reviews his life as a liberal Southerner with a flair for public service....

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A PASSION FOR POLITICS

Mr. Brownlow, now seventy-five years old, reviews his life as a liberal Southerner with a flair for public service. Chronically ill as a child, he was happily self-educated with the help of the citizenry of his home town of Buffalo, Missouri. This first volume also concerns his years as a reporter in Tennessee, Kentucky, Washington and the Far East for various newspapers. There is the standard but very well told story of how the cub got his break covering a cyclone because nobody else was on hand. There are nice sidelights such as the story of Supreme Court Associate Justice Harlan wrote for him in complete journalese -- in return for fetching some chewing tobacco. Brownlow tells of his error as a young man in dining at an all-Negro restaurant in Washington; of his original shock and discomfiture; and how the episode got him over his ""vain and foolish"" prejudice. As the first volume ends, Mr. Brownlow embarks on the second phase of his career, that of public administration, by appointment of President Wilson as Commissioner of the District of Columbia. It is Mr. Brownlow's misfortune that so many other journalists have recounted their histories leaving little room for newness, but his tales are well told and never lacking in pace and interest.

Pub Date: March 11, 1955

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: University of Chicago

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1955