A good many steps up from The Camberwell Beauty but still far from the standard set by Magnolia Street and Five Silver...

READ REVIEW

THE DANCE GOES ON

A good many steps up from The Camberwell Beauty but still far from the standard set by Magnolia Street and Five Silver Daughters. He has completely deserted his familiar settings and gone to pre-revolution Russia and the story of a dancer. Borodin of the Russian Ballet ""inherits"" a new born child of one of his old pupils, and determines to bring her up as exponent of the refinement of his accumulated principles of the art of the dance. As she approaches maturity, he feels he owns her and succeeds in smashing her budding romance with a somewhat leftish surgeon who has saved her brother's life. Eventually, despairing of patching up broken hearts and faiths, she pledges herself to the prince who has adored her for years. Then -- at the peak of her fame comes the revolution. Her ex-lover, at last in the saddle, cannot prevent the destruction of her home nor her arrest, but closes his eyes to her ultimate escape, managed through a clever trick of her brother's. They repledge their love at the border -- and she goes on to her prince, and he returns to his duty. It is an unimportant story, but well-paced and colorful, and not too much strain on the mental adroitness. Definitely tripe for rental libraries, but better written than most, and the Golding name will guarantee a certain extension beyond that border line.

Pub Date: May 28, 1937

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Farrar & Rinehart

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1937