This analysis of the ""Political Trends, 1952-1956"" is based on the rather formidable battery of statistics Elmo Roper and...

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IS THERE A REPUBLICAN MAJORITY?

This analysis of the ""Political Trends, 1952-1956"" is based on the rather formidable battery of statistics Elmo Roper and his organization have compiled prior to and following the 1952 election which are here evaluated to determine who voted for Eisenhower-and why- and what are the blights on the new Republican majority. And even if this is chiefly a Post interpretation, rather than a political prediction of the 1954 and 1956 elections. It is particularly significant as an indicator of opinion at the various levels of American life economic, ethnic, etc. The shifting issues of the last twenty years and the new type of KKK on which the Eisenhower campaign was based- Korea- Communism and corruption; the personality of the man himself- the biggest drawing card in the deck; the elements of the vote (Irish, Poles, Italians, etc.); the new ""non-solid South"" and the women- a decisive feature; the shifting economy, to a higher level, which created a new white collar, suburban vote; the so-called independent vote, much of which Elsenhower was to secure, and which is the big imponderable of the 1954 and the 1956 elections; the Democratic weaknesses, and Stevenson's; all this assesses the elements which make up public opinion fluid and fickle as it may be and leads to the conclusion, such as it is, that while the Republican majority is not yet in- the Democrats cannot be counted out.... In an election year, a market for this type of material should not be hard to find.

Pub Date: June 9, 1954

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Harper

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 1954