Here, Simons, former deputy assistant secretary of state for European affairs, and recently nominated (though not yet...

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THE END OF THE COLD WAR?

Here, Simons, former deputy assistant secretary of state for European affairs, and recently nominated (though not yet confirmed) as ambassador to Poland, offers a cogent historical overview of US-Soviet relations during the past decade. Simons sees the Reagan Administration's abandonment of the 1970's concept of ""linkage"" as the crucial change in our foreign policy of the 80's. Under linkage, America moved for or against Soviet interests only in response to Soviet moves for or against American interests--a quid pro quo approach that, Simon says, led to no real progress in foreign affairs. A good example of the new approach, he believes, is our response to the downing of the Korean airliner in 1983. Although Pres. Reagan led a chores of indignation about the killing of peaceful air travelers, he announced that he would not allow the Soviets to turn the KAL incident into a bilateral US-Soviet crisis. While applying appropriate sanctions related to air travel, he sent American representatives back to the negotiating tables in Geneva. It became American policy to push negotiations ahead on all fronts, and even to announce goals that the Soviets could not accept--such as complete withdrawal from Afghanistan--and to stand visibly and often for values that most Americans support (e.g., human rights, pluralism, and rule by law). And, Simons points out, American efforts wore greatly aided by the Soviets' growing awareness of the need for internal change--change that now incorporates not only the installation of democratic regimes throughout Eastern Europe, but the beginning of diversity within the Soviet Union itself. Today the Cold War may be ending, Simons says, but diplomatic challenges remain. An intelligent, informed analysis.

Pub Date: Aug. 23, 1990

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: St. Martin's

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 1990