The exotic, earthy background of Africa almost becomes the foreground in this successor to the successful White Witch Doctor...

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BEYOND THE HUNGRY COUNTRY

The exotic, earthy background of Africa almost becomes the foreground in this successor to the successful White Witch Doctor (reported in the May 15, 1950 Bulletin, p. 282). Again Miss Stinetorf tells the story of missionaries in the Dark Continent: her heroine is a woman who grew up in Africa a mission child, nurtured by black Maa Koo and known by the natives as The-Black-Inside-White-Outside-Mama. Laura came to America to study nursing, returned to Africa to suffer with the other missionaries over agriculturist Jimmy Grove's impossible but beautiful wife. When Esther Grove conveniently dies in childbirth, Laura in proper time becomes Mrs. Grove and following the wish of her dead, saintly father treks to the land of the People of the Fan to found a mission. She finds her mission in a village where the treasure hut contains her own father's skull taken for his wisdom after death; she bears her child in the birthing hut. Her husband's death brings a decision to return to America to study agriculture for her People of the Fan, then return. The play of native and white thought, native ways and beliefs is the major part of the book, which again gives the reader a feeling of authenticity and immediacy although characters and sometimes facts are loosely handled.

Pub Date: May 26, 1954

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Lippincott

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1954

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