Lynn Caine chafes at the indignities of the big act -- at her own gallantry, at courage fashioned into an accessory for...

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Lynn Caine chafes at the indignities of the big act -- at her own gallantry, at courage fashioned into an accessory for widow's weeds, at ""measuring up as an inspiration"" to friends, only one of whom was to perceive that ""Martin's heroism must have been very difficult for you."" Martin, 50, urbane, a successful New York attorney, dying, an eager guinea pig traveling back and forth to a cancer research program in Baltimore yet finally, accepting the unthinkable, withdrawing into a different psychic dimension; Buffy and Jonny, ages five and nine, told everything but really nothing; the widow, frayed like thrum, behaving irrationally, startled by what she would only later come to understand were predictable stages of working through grief. Writing (and very well indeed) with a candor that must have been painful for her, Caine extrapolates the dimensions of her very personal experience, from the emotional intangibles to the ultimate and very practical economies of an altered lifestyle. Not since Caitlin Thomas has anyone written quite so affectingly of the turmoil of bereavement -- and by her own strong instinct for survival (although there were to be times she would question it) Caine suggests that no one need compromise for a leftover life.

Pub Date: May 29, 1974

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Morrow

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1974