You might not like Robert Short but Lynn Hall leaves you in no doubt as to how he got that way; though a little exaggerated...

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THE SIEGE OF SILENT HENRY

You might not like Robert Short but Lynn Hall leaves you in no doubt as to how he got that way; though a little exaggerated in their open advocacy of a caveat emptor ethic, his parents are recognizable middle class types. Robert himself is an operator who coolly psychs out his high school teachers and is already running a profitable chinchilla business in his basement. With bushy-tailed eagerness for more easy money, Robert schemes to worm his way into the confidence of Silent Henry, a lonely old man squatting in the house of a dead friend and supplementing his social security by gathering the wild Ginseng plant. Despite the predictability of their coming together, Robert's growing scruples as he goes after Henry's carefully guarded secret of the plants' location and Henry's grateful response to the boy's company despite his reservations about Robert's motives, makes for an involving and sympathetic conclusion.

Pub Date: Nov. 1, 1972

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Follett

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1972