The Gourmet would find this less alluring than B. Y. Chao's How to Cook and Eat in Chinese (John Day), but the average cook...

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CHINESE COOKERY

The Gourmet would find this less alluring than B. Y. Chao's How to Cook and Eat in Chinese (John Day), but the average cook will feel that it is much easier to follow and makes fewer demands upon an almost esoteric mentality. In other words, this is a straight from the shoulder first Chinese cookbook for the American cook, containing 100 practical recipes, but not giving detailed instructions about ways of cooking. The introductory chapters outlines the basic differences between Chinese and American methods -- ways in which vegetables are cooked, mixed dishes, preparation of meats, use of vegetable oils, and so on. The main groups into which the recipes fall are rice and noodles, poultry and meat, fish and eggs, soups, vegetables and salads.

Pub Date: N/A

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Translantic Arts

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 1945