Experience in homespun terms, a woman's book of stout resourcefulness, this is complete recall as the author tells the story...

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THOUGH LONG THE TRAIL

Experience in homespun terms, a woman's book of stout resourcefulness, this is complete recall as the author tells the story of her mother, Mary Quinn, in Mary's own language. Eight year old Mary, adoring her Pa, who could be stylish or Irish, worshipping her Ma who was often purely worried, gives a vivid picture of their overland trip from Rock Island, Illinois, to Oakland, California, over the Oregon Trail. They stopped off for a long stay in Salt Lake City, and they finally settled-they thought-in a contrastingly civilized home. Then there was more wandering, to Nevada, Missouri -- and finally to a home in Joplin, where her mother died, leaving young Mary in charge. Later Mary marries, and follows her husband to Arkansas, Kansas, New Mexico...There's the struggle in isolated places; the loss of her babies; the return to Joplin and Pa. Natural in speech and thought, this graphic recital is sometimes touching, sometimes gay, always honest. Good Americana.

Pub Date: July 18, 1946

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Rinehart

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 1946