The Whitneys' hard-headed advice will separate the good prospects for veterinary school from those qualified only by their...

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ANIMAL DOCTOR: The History and Practice of Veterinary Medicine

The Whitneys' hard-headed advice will separate the good prospects for veterinary school from those qualified only by their sentimental attachment to pets. Not only do they give a balanced review of the profession's many specialties -- from meat inspection to laboratory research and teaching -- but they guide their readers through a realistic facsimile of the typical (large-animal or mixed practice) vet's day, which is more likely to consist of inoculating and giving pelvic examinations to dairy cattle than of dramatic operations. Veterinary education is similarly organized to favor applicants with an agricultural orientation, and the outlook for students interested primarily in small animals -- and particularly for residents of New York City -- is unfavorable. Though discouraging, all this is much more helpful than the rosy promises usually made by career handbooks, and should be prescribed for anyone considering becoming an animal doctor.

Pub Date: March 1, 1973

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: McKay

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1973