The author is known for her many books about horses, but Henrietta is a less aristocratic member of the barnyard. She's only...

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HENRIETTA

The author is known for her many books about horses, but Henrietta is a less aristocratic member of the barnyard. She's only a hen, but she has personality and determination, too. Since the clucking of the other hens unnerved her, she looked for peace and privacy when she went to nest. She was chased away from various unsuitable domiciles she tried to establish, but then she roosted firmly in the barrel that was supposed to be the bloodhound kennel. Henrietta and Brenda, the bloodhound, amicably agreed to share quarters, Henrietta was happy to baby sit for (on) the puppies, and the puppies took turns crouching on the eggs when Henrietta was bored with brooding. It's a quiet, pullet-sized plot, made attractive by Henrietta's idiosyncratic but very hennish ways. The simple, uncluttered, delicately drawn black and white ink drawings are quite pleasant.

Pub Date: Nov. 10, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Vanguard

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1966